Nano Ecosystem to Connect Emerging Technologies and Markets to Developing Nations

Nanotechnology truly is the “2nd (Great) Industrial Revolution.” From Bio-Medicines, Electronics and Renewable Energy, to Water Filtration and 3-D Printed Anti-Counterfeiting Measures … ‘Nano’ will impact almost every aspect of our daily lives with an estimated Total Addressable Market of $3.9 Trillion by 2020

1 Oasis500

Based in Amman, Jordan, Oasis500 is an early-stage investment company focused on tech startups. Participating candidates get approximately $31,000 in cash and incubation in Oasis500 offices for four months – longer if they take on another round of funding. Oasis500 takes a 15-20% equity stake in each company – Forbes.

Accelerate and Leverage Nanotechnologies via MENA Entrepreneurs Who Build Startups

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Victor W. Huang in Casablanca, Morocco at the Global Annual Conference of CEED – an organization that assists entrepreneurs in several emerging markets, met countless inspiring people, mostly from Morocco but also from nearby places. He could virtually taste the electricity in the air. Entrepreneurs and other business people were continuously buzzing around the event, pitching, trading, and pursuing their dreams. Morocco, it seems, is rising.

02 Flat6Labs

With offices in Cairo, Egypt, and recently expanding to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Flat6Labs is an accelerator dedicated to supporting startups inthe region over the period of three month cycles. It acquires a 10-20% in the company of a participating team in exchange for $10-20,000 cash. Supporting around six startups a cycle, Flat6Labs invests in about 28 startups a year. Founded in 2011 by Sawari Ventures, an Egyptian VC firm, it is a member of the Global Accelerator Network.

Excelerate

GAN

Global Accelerator Network– 6 continents, 100+ cities, 70+ accelerators – 1 standard for entrepreneurial excellence. A network of the most respected accelerators around the world. GAN accelerators provide startups with the resources necessary to create businesses, wherever they are.

French-Arab Initiative is Backing Projects Tackling MENA Growth Challenges

Lobby -MENA Growth Challenges JAOU_FestivalThinkersandDoers

The startups have different profiles, says Jourde. Some are French looking to expand in the Arab world, others are Arab looking to grow within the MENA region and/or France. They can be tech, culture or education focused.

This culture has to be promoted among students, and private companies, and universities should work hand in hand to make finding internship, and sharing experience easier.

[The] last five years have proved that the development of an ecosystem for tech companies requires the development of a community, through interaction and events. Ideally, a lobby should defend the interests of the various players, and work to make the administrative, fiscal, financial and legal environment more innovation compatible.

This half-decade has also shown that offering funds is not enough. A quick look at MNF results proves that young entrepreneurs need mentorship and followup more than funds. The digital economy startups need incubators, technological hubs, and accelerators, to become a vector of social and economic improvement.

Emerging Technologies for Emerging Nations

In Developing Nations from Morocco to Jordan smart, talented thinkers are creating an impressive start-up culture in the region. As a result, financial institutions and non-government organizations have begun setting up numerous seed investment initiatives to support this rise in cultural innovation.

MERiseStartupIncubators

Entrepreneurs stretched across developing countries are experimenting and innovating with new products, services and systems that can tackle agribusiness, access to energy, health care, education and more. More solutions need to come out from developing countries — from the entrepreneurs witnessing the social challenges.

Social enterprises have the potential to be a much more efficient vehicle for philanthropy and, if designed well, can scale, said Jim Sorenson, entrepreneur, investor, philanthropist and chairman of the board of directors of the Sorenson Impact Foundation.

“I see it as a financial revolution,” he said. “The barriers really are that we are still at a nascent stage. There is lots of activity but we lack an ecosystem that addresses the needs.” – Jim Sorenson – Sorenson Impact Foundation via Devex Impact

A Sustaining Nano-Ecosystem – “A New Paradigm in Nanotechnology Innovation”

GNTThumbNail“GNT™ is excited to be part of this ‘Revolution’ – A $3.9 Trillion Industry by 2022. With leading Nano-University Research Programs, and Marketplace Industry Leaders, our Business Model engages and fosters a new paradigm in nanotechnology innovation.” Bruce W. Hoy, C.E.O of Genesis Nanotechnology, Inc.  DISCOVER – DEVELOP – COMMERCIALIZE – EXIT

RiceTopIncubatorGenesis Nanotechnology, Inc™ provides Investors with broad participation and diversification opportunities in emerging “Nano-Markets” by acquiring Early Stage University developed nanotechnologies, then developing Patents, Trade Secrets, Processes, Applications (TRL Scale) and Integration Protocols for Commercialization.

  • We Build Relationships & Develop Early Stage Enabling (Platform) Nanotechnologies (ESTs) with our University Partners
  • We Develop and Position the Technology & Business Plan for Commercialization
  • We Engage Our Proprietary Proprietary ‘Alternative Funding Model’ to Sustain the EST’s through Commercialization (Revenue) and Exit (Sale)
  • We Integrate, Scale and Lower Costs – Enabling New Market Opportunities
  • We Create Leverage (@ 500:1) & Increased Share Value for our Investors.

GNT Business PlanGNT™’s Proprietary Model mitigates Investor Risk, reduces Equity Dilution and provides Investor Leverage by Engaging and Integrating Public & Government programs: Tax Incentives & Credits, Non-Recourse Funding & Grants. (Ex. SRED, SBIR, VCC & NSERC). By “piggy-backing” Partner University Resources, initial capital requirements & ‘burn rates’ are significantly reduced.

NEWTSymbolRice logo_rice3Developing an early stage innovation from the lab to a product that is commercially viable can be a complicated process. The Process requires an experienced technology and business management team to realize the full potential of the innovation. Working in concert with our Partnership University researchers, GNT™ is focused on enhancing the commercialization opportunity of the innovation. World Economic ForumAs the ‘D’ in ‘R&D’, GNT™ streamlines / manages commercialization processes, allowing Researchers to focus on research … and the Business to focus on creating a Financially Viable Enterprise. We provide proven Business and Technical experience from “Proof of Concept and Scalability” to a “Predictable Exit Strategy”. Our proprietary Business Model fully leverages Investor Capital by taking advantage of Non-Dilutive, Non-Recourse Government Supports and Tax Incentives (Ex. SRED, VCC, SBIR, NSERC), supporting R & D expenditures by 40% (or more), mitigating our Investors’ Risk.

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MIT: Faster, more durable water filters: Plugging up (the holes) in leaky graphene.

MITPhotoFor faster, longer-lasting water filters, some scientists are looking to graphene –thin, strong sheets of carbon — to serve as ultrathin membranes, filtering out contaminants to quickly purify high volumes of water – View also Graphene 100 Times More Efficient.

GNT is creating strong alliances with Nanotechnology Global Research Universities together with Nanotechnology Marketplace and Industry Leaders to commercialize cutting edge technologies, bringing together “Science and Business” to foster nanotechnology innovation. RiceAlliance

If such development is bridged with a proper platform for innovative technologies and management practices, it is quite certain that the technology and investments can be scaled up to generate paramount economic and environmental impacts for years to come – Science Direct

Collaborations Connect Universities and Industry with MENA

Nanotech Egypt

Cairo University is seeking to connect with civil society to train young people and faculty graduates to be market ready.

Regional North America and European Cross Border Hubs Bio-based Chemistry Programof training, research, transfer and innovation, convert new concepts into cornerstones of economic and social transformation for emerging nations.

Because of the “predicted broad impact on society, governments of both developed and developing countries must investigate what the likely applications would be, and whether or how to best facilitate their evolution. They affirm that the combination of multiple complex technologies involved with the development of many nanotechnologies will necessitate the training and support of researchers capable of this type of technological interaction. Late comer countries can build market capabilities in the area, but only with high level of government support in terms of training and infrastructure” – Nanotechnology and Development: What’s in it for Emerging Countries?

Shared User Facilities Considerations?

The US National Science Foundation (NSF) will provide a total of $81 million over five years to support 16 sites and a coordinating office as part of a new National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure (NNCI).

Holding a photolithography mask in the clean room of the Chapel Hill Analytical and Nannofabrication Labratory ( (CHANL) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Holding a photolithography mask in the clean room of the Chapel Hill Analytical and Nannofabrication Labratory ( (CHANL) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

French Development Agency (AFD) – Shaping Sustainable Futures

Connect Universities and Industry from South to North with the French Development Agency (AFD) (and/or other EU agency) and USAID Program Development and co-financing via the African Development Bank (AfDB) as AFD’s 3rd largest co-financier. “The partnership between the two institutions includes water and sanitation infrastructure. Africa is a priority for AFD.” (African Water Facility, July 2015)Societal Grand Challenges are to be addressed via knowledge exchange and experiences in nanotechnology.

AFDWhatWeOffer

African Development Bank (AfDB)

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African Water Facility / African Development Bank

AFD’s 3rd largest co-financier. The partnership between our two institutions has been built in the sectors of infrastructure, water and sanitation, agriculture and the private sector. Africa is a priority for AFD and reinforcing its partnership with the Bank is consequently a core objective. New areas for partnerships are to be explored, particularly in the sectors of urban infrastructure and the fight against climate change.

Bottoms-Up Leadership and Partnerships for Long-Term Solutions

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MIT: PhD student Natasha Wright makes water safe to drink for rural, off-grid Indian villages.

MITPhotoWright joined the lab of Amos Winter, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering, in 2012. The lab was just getting established, and the aim of Wright’s project was vague at first: Work on water treatment in India, with a possible focus on filtering biological contaminants from groundwater to make it safe to drink. Now, three years and six trips to India later, this is the sole focus of her work.

While other companies are already installing desalination systems across India, their designs are intended to be grid-powered. When operating off the grid, these systems are not cost-effective, essentially blocking disconnected, rural villages from using them.

Wright’s solution offers an alternative to grid power: She’s designed a village-scale desalination system that runs on solar power. Since her system is powered by the sun, operational and maintenance costs are fairly minimal: The system requires an occasional cartridge filter change, and that’s it.

The system is also equipped to treat the biological contaminants that Wright initially thought she’d be treating, using ultraviolet light. The end result is safe drinking water that also tastes good.

Entrepreneurship – Innovation – Science – Technology

Build momentum for Nano Enabling 21st Century International Developers

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Global Programs Create Pipeline for Connecting Points

Existing Innovation Programs can be synchronized to create Connecting Points with Universities and Industry from South to North to accelerate Nano Enabled Technologies.

TechConnectBest

TechConnect is a global technology outreach & development organization, matching highly qualified emerging technologies with corporate, government and investment partners through community driven peer-review programs.

TechConnect uses a community based peer-review process to identify and select only the top innovations to be presented to our corporate and investment partners. This process provides for a very high quality vetting of technologies and allows the actual technology end-user a voice in selecting partnership and investment opportunities.

WorldConnectInnovation

TechConnect typically links its Innovation Pipeline Programs to one of its world class conferences in order to broaden the exposure of the innovations and provide the largest possible pool of opportunities for our corporate and investment partners.

NSF-ICorpProgram

I-Corps Teams are composed of three main members: the principal investigator, the entrepreneurial lead and the mentor. The principal investigator (PI) serves as the technical lead and project manager.

The entrepreneurial lead (EL), typically a postdoctoral researcher, graduate student, or other student, possesses relevant technical knowledge and a deep commitment to investigate the commercial landscape surrounding the innovation. The entrepreneurial lead should also be prepared to support the transition of the technology, should the I-Corps project demonstrate a level of readiness appropriate to leave the academic institution.

The mentor brings entrepreneurial experience and serves as the principal guide in determining the technology disposition.

PEER Connects Scientists Partnering with U.S. Collaborators

PEERMekongUSAID

“Clinical trials are a critical stage of product development for the pharmaceutical biotech company,” and those clinical trials are most likely a major cost of the investment portfolio. The costs of clinical trials and market introductions can be absorbed by the public sector by smart companies who take advantage and include public entities during the scale-up process. This is a ‘great asset’ Genesis Nanotechnology brings to the investment negotiating table. Historically the private sector has not taken advantage of public sector leverages, and indications are still not really availing themselves of the opportunity.

USAID is further supporting technological cooperation through Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research (PEER), its engagement with the National Academies of Science that provides grants to scientists in developing countries who partner with U.S. collaborators. PEER is supporting scientists from LMI countries who are working together to find scientific solutions to the region’s problems. “Science does not stop at the border or at the water’s edge,” said Jessica Robin, program director for PEER for the National Science Foundation, a partner in the effort. “As PEER continues to grow, both the U.S. scientific community and our foreign partners benefit” (USAID June 2015, p.15).

SBIR National Conference: Innovation Partnering Program
Co-located with TechConnect & the National Innovation Summit, the SBIR Conference focuses on funding programs that encourage small businesses to engage in Federal Research/Research and Development (R/R&D) and to commercialize technological innovations. SBIR Phase I and II Companies are encouraged to submit your Innovation for review, showcase and presentation.

The Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers (I/UCRC) program develops long-term partnerships among industry, academe, and government. The centers are catalyzed by a small investment from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and are primarily supported by industry center members, with NSF taking a supporting role in the development and evolution of the center. Each center is established to conduct research that is of interest to both the industry members and the center faculty. An I/UCRC contributes to the nation’s research infrastructure base and enhances the intellectual capacity of the engineering and science workforce through the integration of research and education. As appropriate, an I/UCRC uses international collaborations to advance these goals within the global context – (SBIR Conference).

Emerging Nations’ Bridge to Clean Water: Nano-Enabled Desalination

No company that wants to have a future can afford to slight the breakthrough opportunity, This typically is the opportunity to make the future happen.” (the Drucker Exchange) “The hope is that when new [water] projects are proposed, all affected stakeholders will be able to constructively participate and achieve equitable outcomes.” (USAID Stakeholders)

Nanotechnologies and Emerging Nations – Going from this….

Going from ThisPollutedWater

By 2030, more than 600 million Indians will live in crowded cities crumbling with creaky infrastructure.

In a radical departure from the previous government’s rural focus in the past decade, Prime Minister Narendra Modi wants to boost cities as engines of economic growth. By 2030, officials say, 70 percent of India’s economic output is expected to come from the cities.

Cities in the past were built on riverbanks. They are now built along highways.

(Sinan Yiter/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

(Photo by Sinan Yiter/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

But in the future, they will be built based on availability of optical-fiber networks and next-generation infrastructure,” Modi said last year, shortly after taking office. But currently running water is available for just two hours every two days. Only 130 of 125,000 homes in the city are connected to the sewage system. Dirty water flows in open drains in cramped neighborhoods. Step-wells and lakes have become garbage dumps. Illegal buildings and slums dot the city. And only two traffic lights work.

…To This!  Getting Cities Where They Need To Be

Although it is not easy to get to this point, it has reached the junction where the technology makes it possible to switch from the traditional route. It is anticipated that the commercial success of the nano-enabled membrane technologies would catalyze the long term economic prosperity by enabling the continuation of sustainable development while also creating industries with valuable new opportunities. If such development is bridged with a proper platform for innovative technologies and management practices, it is quite certain that the technology and investments can be scaled up to generate paramount economic and environmental impacts for years to come.

Managing Services Gear-up for Aid Agencies and Investors

Emerging Nations - A Bridge to the Future - Clean Water via Nano-Enabled Desalination

Emerging Nations – A Bridge to the Future – Clean Water via Nano-Enabled Desalination

“Can we first work toward becoming a functioning city before aspiring to be a smart city? We lack even the basic services that a city should typically provide,” said Suresh Mathur, a retired school teacher who runs a city cleanliness drive called “My Clean School.”

The big challenge is figuring out where the funding for the program will come from. Most city corporations in India are severely cash-strapped. Modi wants Indian and foreign companies to invest in the program, but there is no estimate yet.

Public Partners – Multi Stakeholder Solutions to Make It Happen:

Private Partners – Multi Stakeholder Solutions to Make It Happen:

  • IBM Veolia Water – SMART CITIES Venture VeoliaWaterIndia
  • New solutions for water are currently under development in Lyon, France and Tidworth, England, where Veolia is providing water and wastewater management services to citizens using advanced and automated water management technology. By integrating data across these systems and applying advanced analytics to spot trends and patterns, make predictions and provide a systems-level view of operations, Veolia will contribute to more efficient water management, improved reduction of waste and better cost controls for its clients, as well as improved accountability to city leaders. Designed to help cities operate more efficiently, provide better service to citizens and ensure effective management of resources, these innovative solutions enable them to address some of their most pressing needs and make cities better places to live for their residents.

SMART CITIES – Multi Stakeholder Solutions to Make It Happen:

  • India to collaborate with Singapore and France to build 100 Smart cities.
  • Soon in India, the city of Ajmer could be transformed into a 21st-century “smart city”  — an urban-planning term for the gleaming metropolises of the future that Prime Minister Narendra Modi wants to create by 2022.
India to collaborate with Singapore and France to build 100 Smart cities.

India to collaborate with Singapore and France to build 100 Smart cities.

These modern marvels would be connected by grids in which water, electricity, waste removal, traffic, hospitals and schools are seamlessly integrated with information technology to run them more efficiently.

The government has set aside $7.5 billion to make it happen, and Modi officially launched the program Thursday. But it’s a grand vision that the residents of Ajmer — one of the 100 cities designated for the modernization — are not quite ready for.

Cross-Boundary Scientific Innovation

On the Waterfront: USAID encourages Mekong River stakeholders to make sustainable choices as the region undergoes rapid growth and climate change. Richard Nyberg, USAID

On the Waterfront: USAID encourages Mekong River stakeholders to make sustainable choices as the region undergoes rapid growth and climate change. Richard Nyberg, USAID

Trans-boundary cooperation means more access to data and greater utilization of science and technology. Last year, USAID and NASA jointly launched the 5-year, $7 million SERVIR Mekong project. SERVIR – which means “to serve” in French and Spanish – provides satellite-based Earth observation data and science applications to help countries assess environmental threats, understand changes in weather patterns that could affect crops, and respond to and assess damage from natural disasters. The program aims to facilitate data sharing, develop tools, and train decision makers to protect lives and livelihoods.

“SERVIR gives us an opportunity to open the floodgates for data sharing to improve decision making on the ground,” said David Ganz, chief of party for the USAID SERVIR Mekong project.

To ensure its work addresses local needs, SERVIR Mekong has been planning and holding meetings with government officials across the region, including members of country ministries of forestry, agriculture, and environment, to create what Dr. Ganz called “a demand-driven project.”

Promoting Multi-stakeholder Solutions

All the scientific progress in the world, however, would be meaningless if the resulting discoveries did not find their way into the hands of decision makers. Two additional LMI programs, Smart Infrastructure for the Mekong (SIM) and the Mekong Partnership for the Environment (MPE), share the goal of encouraging key stakeholders to make sustainable choices as the region undergoes rapid growth.

Launched in late 2013, SIM matches technical expertise to governmental requests. The program will provide $1.5 million over the next year to a variety of projects, including ones focused on designing fish passage systems for dams and improving watershed management in the region.

“This program has turned our normal way of doing aid upside down,” said Alfred Nakatsuma, director of environment for USAID’s Regional Development Mission for Asia. “Instead of creating a project and implementing it based on what we think should be happening, it’s about listening better and providing the government and the people with what they are asking for – providing, of course, it’s a sound course of action.”

MPE also seeks to inform development decision-making, emphasizing the active participation of everyone with a stake in development – government, private sector, and civil society. The four-year, $15 million program is acting on growing calls for greater regional cooperation to reduce the impacts of the rapid pace of investment and development in the Lower Mekong region. By supporting efforts to improve environmental and social impact assessment as a means to inform project planning, MPE is encouraging inclusiveness in decision-making in order to reduce the negative impacts of development projects. The hope is that when new infrastructure projects are proposed, all affected stakeholders will be able to constructively participate and achieve equitable outcomes.

Desalination “Best Resort” To Worldwide Water Challenges

How soon can we use the oceans to quench the world's thirst?

How soon can we use the oceans to quench the world’s thirst?

Back from 2030 – Lessons from the Future to Address Present Desalination Challenges!

No company that wants to have a future can afford to slight the breakthrough opportunity,” Peter Drucker wrote in Managing for Results. “This typically is the opportunity to make the future happen.” (the Drucker Exchange) –

LookingBackfromFuture

The 2020s combination of increasingly severe droughts, aging infrastructure and the depletion of underground aquifer was endangering millions of people around the world. The on-going population growth was only exacerbating this, with global freshwater supplies continually stretched to their limits. This forced a rapid expansion of desalination technology. The overall situation was in the red zone. In 2015 the pending disaster was becoming A Looming National Issue for the world’s most developed country, it was high time for the scientists and policy makers to seriously address the issue before letting it go beyond control. By the early 21st century, A tire rests on the dry bed of Lake Mendocino, a key Mendocino County reservoir, in Ukiah, California February 25, 2014. (Noah Berger/Reuters)the world’s demand for resources was growing exponentially. The UN estimated that humanity would require over 30 percent more water between 2012 and 2030. Historical improvements in freshwater production efficiency were no longer able to keep pace with a ballooning population, made worse by the effects of climate change. In the 2040s and beyond, desalination will play an even more crucial role, as humanity adapts to a rapidly changing climate. Ultimately, it will become the world’s primary source of freshwater, as non-renewable sources like fossil aquifers are depleted around the globe.

In the year 2015 according to the World Bank, 1.6 billion people were living in countries and regions with an absolute water crisis and the number was expected to rise to 2.8 billion people by 2025. Some coastal and low lying areas such as Bangladesh, Maldeep and parts of India and Sri Lanka were already facing massive sea water intrusion and increased salination in their estuaries, rivers, lakes and other forms of surface water. Much of the developed countries including the US, Canada, Australia, and Europe had to cope with droughts and on growing risk of storms, floods and forest fire. Asia had already been the worst region of storm, flood and drought stricken area of the world with poor infrastructure facilities to cope up the on growing stress.

DecliningWaterperCapita2030c

Amid the turmoil, even greater advances were being made in desalination. It was acknowledged that present trends in capacity – though impressive compared to earlier decades – were insufficient to satisfy global demand and therefore a major, fundamental breakthrough would be needed on a large scale.

Unfortunately, patents were secured by corporations that initially limited desalination’s wider use. A number of high-profile international lawsuits were brought, as entrepreneurs and companies attempted to develop their own versions. With a genuine crisis unfolding, this led to an eventual restructuring of intellectual property rights. However, thanks to Genesis Nanotechnology Business Model (GNT), many companies and entrepreneurs benefited in the leveraging of Nanotechnology Intellectual Properties, Trade Secrets, and Processes. Acquiring, holding and developing technologies to mature, GNT was well positioned to take full advantage of the emerging commercial opportunities for fabricated and integrated nano-materials by partnering with Universities and Corporations with a vested interest in key technology development. Any company desirous of accessing and scaling-up nanotechnologies – especially for 80-90 percent reduction of costs for water desalination and remediation purposes was talking to GNT’s  Founding Managing Partner, CEOBruce W Hoy.  gnt-business-plan

By 2030, graphene-based filtration systems had closed most of the gap between supply and demand, easing the global water shortage. But the delayed introduction of this revolutionary technology had caused problems in many vulnerable parts of the world. The author asks, “Can we hasten or change the outcome of ‘Our Future’?”

In 2015 – Another Seven to 10 years of DevelopmentSeaWaterSolution

Nanotechnology’s influence to alleviate and address societal water challenges had been proven – “Imagine getting fire-hose volumes and velocities out of your garden hose” –  Graphene Nanotechnology Makes Desalination 100 Times More Efficient.

The motivation [was] there to solve the world’s water needs, companies [said]. “According to the U.N., the No. 1 cause of death and illness in developing nations is waterborne diseases,” [said] GE’s Jones. “We have the technology to fix these problems. It’s very easy to get motivated because of the great opportunity to do good.”  Aside from GE, International Power, Suez and Veolia, other companies that construct, own and/or operate desalination systems worldwide include The AE S Corp. (AES), Crane Co.’s (CR) Crane Environmental, Siemens AG’s (SI) Power Generation unit and ITT Corp. (ITT). ABB Ltd . (ABB) provides electrical systems for desalination plants, and Met-Pro Corp.’s (MPR) Fybroc division manufactures pumps used in reverse-osmosis plants.

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FutureTimeline.net 2030

By 2030, there are an additional two billion people, most of them from poor countries. Humanity’s footprint is such that it now requires the equivalent of two whole Earths to sustain itself in the long term. Farmland, fresh water and natural resources are becoming scarcer by the day. A combination of increasingly severe droughts, aging infrastructure and the depletion of underground aquifers is now endangering millions of people around the world. The on-going population growth is only exacerbating this, with global freshwater supplies continually stretched to their limits. This is forcing a rapid expansion of desalination technology. Yemen Fights - Deaths Over WaterThis exponential progress was dwarfed by the sheer volume of water required by an ever-expanding global economy, which now included the burgeoning middle classes of China and India. The world was adding an extra 80 million people each year – equivalent to the entire population of Germany. By 2017, Yemen was in a state of emergency, with its capital almost entirely depleted of groundwater. Significant regional instability began to affect the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia, as water resources became weapons of war.

Nanotechnology Offered Just Such A Breakthrough

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Graphene-based nanofiltration technology for removing salt from water. Credit: David Cohen-Tanugi

The use of graphene in the water filtration process had been demonstrated in the early 2010s. This involved atom-thick sheets of carbon, able to separate salt from water using much lower pressure, and hence, much lower energy. This was due to the extreme precision with which the perforations in each graphene membrane could be manufactured. At only a nanometre across, each hole was the perfect size for a water molecule to fit through. An added benefit was the very high durability of graphene, potentially making desalination plants more reliable and longer-lasting.

 

Although it is not easy to get to this point, it has reached the junction where the technology makes it possible to switch from the traditional route. The potentiality of CNT membranes to replace RO, NF and UF membranes is depicted in Fig. 7 and comparative advantages are discussed.  It is anticipated that the commercial success of the nano-enabled membrane technologies would catalyze the long term economic prosperity by enabling the continuation of sustainable development while also creating industries with valuable new opportunities.

The Alternative Route for Sustainable Development

If such development is bridged with a proper platform for innovative technologies and management practices, it is quite certain that the technology and investments can be scaled up to generate paramount economic and environmental impacts for years to come. The unprecedented quantum leaps evidence the versatility of nano materials and their nano composites to provide the alternative route for sustainable development. This serves the main reason for the industries and stakeholders to be optimistic with the capability of these new generation technology to make a large difference for modern, affordable and environmentally sound remedy for water shortage crisis. Undeniably, the transformation to the era of nanotechnology has the potential to bring the capacity of membrane science and engineering a big step forward for the desalination technology to flourish.

Five to Ten Years

Although considerable effort is still needed to fill the gaps and reduce disparities between the pipe-dream and the reality, with the accelerating knowledge and technological transfer from academic to industries, it is envisaged that in the next five to ten years, the fundamental science and applied engineering knowledge in nanotechnology R&D and infrastructure development will help to obtain ultimate solutions to develop and commercialize the next generation of sustainable membrane products as well as desalination technologies.

Nanotechnologies – “Game-Changing Opportunity”

Long-term safe and natural solutions – Mosquito and Pest Control

“Funding is apt to be a major challenge for malaria programmes; the continued scale-up of diagnosis in the public sector and beyond is contingent on adequate resources” according to the World Health Organization’s 2014 Malaria Diagnostic Technology Market Landscape. However, this challenge presents opportunity as quantum and nano-based technologies provide Access to Billion Dollar Markets for both public and private sector investors and International Aid and Development Programs.

“Solving Grand Challenges via private sector led nano-enabled technologies and enterprises”

1x2-logo-smGenesis Nano Technology acquires University developed ‘Nano Intellectual Properties (IP’s)’, then develops patents, Trade Secrets and Processes for commercialization for the IP’s. Developed Technologies are marketed and developed across a broad spectrum of mature Industry Sectors. Funding entities from private and public sectors to include Investment Organizations, International Banking and Development Institutions, International Aid Agencies, International / National Economic Development Funds, and Governmental Agencies including Medical/Health, Commerce, Agriculture, and Trade.

Malaria Diagnostics Technology and Market Landscape –  2014-malaria-diagnostics-landscape-2nd-edition

  • In Field Nano Portable Diagnostic Technology proven for rapid, safe, sensitive, and remote detection of malaria-specific hemozoin. Hemozoin can be found in any parasite type and any blood stage… [technology] detects and mechanically destroys the malaria parasite in a single theranostic procedure – Nano Theranostic Device
  • Non-insecticidal developer of compounds which can be delivered spatially – Olfactor Labs
  • GNT Nitrate Remediation ‘catalyst’ technology  – Palladium-on-Gold Bimetallic Nano Particles – Rice University
  • Wireless sensors incorporating nitrate selective compounds for precision agriculture – suprasensor.com

“Funding is apt to be a major challenge for malaria programmes; the continued scale-up of diagnosis in the public sector and beyond is contingent on adequate resources. As diagnostic capacity increases, there is a game-changing opportunity to improve the epidemiological picture of malaria and it would make sense to invest in strengthening case reporting and surveillance.

While there has been significant progress in the scale-up of malaria diagnosis recently and an increase in interventions shaping malaria diagnostics markets, this report highlights several important gaps and opportunities to accelerate access to testing in meaningful ways.

However, in general, progress of many pipeline technologies has slowed in the past year, in part due to lack of funding and lack of clear pull from the market. Finally, the scale-up of diagnosis presents an important and unique opportunity to learn about and improve the body of knowledge on the malaria diagnostics market. Operational research, work to define the needs and markets for new technologies, and monitoring and evaluation efforts to better understand the market and the impact of investments are urgently needed.

2014-malaria-diagnostics-landscape-2nd-edition

This report is part of an ongoing initiative within UNITAID to describe and monitor the landscape for malaria commodities.It focuses on technology and market dynamics around malaria diagnostic products. It includes an overview of the current diagnostics technology and market landscape, a high-level perspective on barriers to access, and potential opportunities for market-based interventions to address these barriers. Information in this report was derived through a variety of methods, including desk research, literature reviews, dataset analyses and consultation with experts.

Nanotechnology’s Full Potential: A Clear Picture.

Water for Emerging Nations: Access NanoTech and Get Ready for NEWT!

Bottoms-Up Leadership and Partnerships for Long-Term Solutions

If such development is bridged with a proper platform for innovative technologies and management practices, it is quite certain that the technology and investments can be scaled up to generate paramount economic and environmental impacts for years to come – Science Direct

The Alternative Route for Sustainable Water Development

Quenching the World's Thirst for Seawater

Quenching the World’s Thirst for Seawater

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Nanotechnology Enabled Water Treatment Systems

The unprecedented quantum leaps evidence the versatility of nano materials and their nano composites to provide the alternative route for sustainable development. This serves the main reason for the industries and stakeholders to be optimistic with the capability of these new generation technology to make a large difference for modern, affordable and environmentally sound remedy for water shortage crisis. Undeniably, the transformation to the era of nanotechnology has the potential to bring the capacity of membrane science and engineering a big step forward for the desalination technology to flourish – Science Direct

Engaging Technologies – Enabling Solutions

Genesis Nanotechnology, Inc. (GNT™) creates public and private collaborations to address long-term (5-7 years) water scarcity challenges via discovery and development of applicable nanotechnologies – Leveraging the Water Challenge.

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NEWT Center will use nanotechnology to transform economics of water treatment A Rice University-led consortium of industry, university and government partners has been chosen to establish one of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) prestigious Engineering Research Centers in Houston to develop compact, mobile, off-grid water-treatment systems that can provide clean water to millions of people who lack it and make U.S. energy production more sustainable and cost-effective.

Nanotechnology Enabled Water Treatment Systems, or NEWT, is Houston’s first NSF Engineering Research Center (ERC) and only the third in Texas in nearly 30 years. It is funded by a five-year, $18.5 million NSF grant renewable for a potential term of 10 years. NEWT brings together experts from Rice, Arizona State University, Yale University and the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) to work with more than 30 partners: including Shell, Baker Hughes, UNESCO, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and NASA.

As the D’ in ‘R&D,’ GNT™ streamlines and manages the commercialization process, allowing Researchers to focus on research … and the Business to focus on creating a Financially Viable Enterprise. We provide proven Business and Technical experience from “Proof of Concept and Scalability” to a Predictable Exit Strategy.” Our Proprietary Business Model takes full advantage of Non-Dilutive, Non-Recourse Government Supports and Tax Incentives, fully leveraging Investors’ capital and mitigating Investors’ exposure to Risk.

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University of Bordeaux (Idex) responds to Europe’s Nanotechnology Revolution via CANADA and CALIFORNIA.

RiceLogoGNT strong alliances with Nanotechnology Global Research Universities together with Nanotechnology Marketplace and Industry Leaders commercialize cutting edge technologies, bringing together “Science and Business” to foster nanotechnology innovation. The Canadian Government has committed over $1.1 Billion through the Economic Action Plan 2013 (Federal) and through the Small Business Venture Capital Act (Provincial) seeking to stimulate economic activity and world leading research and development in Nanotechnology Innovation. The United States at the same time has invested over $3.7 Billion via the National Nanotechnology Initiative and the European Union over $1.6 Billion to foster nanotechnology innovation and commercialization.

Technology Not the Only Needed Solution

Water Management – Emerging Nations (click)

Technology and Costs have been primary hindrances for developing countries to access water via desalination. However, even if cost effective technology was available [today] many countries could not avail themselves to the technology because of management issues.

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Getting Cities to Where They Need To Be!

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Yemen Old City of Sana’a – ‘most unique coffee varietals in the world.’

The long-term solution to Yemen’s water problems, USAID Veteran – Michael Maxey believes, will be found in helping water user groups return to the rich heritage of traditional water management. By combining these water systems with high value crops and new technology drip irrigation, solar power pumps for water transport, greenhouse production, Yemen can create value and increase the incomes of smallholder farmers. Increased incomes can mean sustainable water use through these traditional systems.

Locals fill their water jerrycans from public taps in Sana’a, Yemen, one of the most water-stressed countries in the world. Photo by: Al Harazi / World Bank / CC BY-NC-ND

Locals fill their water jerrycans from public taps in Sana’a, Yemen, one of the most water-stressed countries in the world. Photo by: Al Harazi / World Bank / CC BY-NC-ND

Yemen Fights - Deaths Over Water

The big challenge is figuring out where the funding for programs will come from.

Transforming Challenges to Opportunities:

The crucial strategy to ensure the commercial success and industry engagement of technology.

EmergingMarkets

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Former Minister of Water and Environment Abd Al-Salam Al-Razzaz (right) and Governor of Taiz Ahmed Showqi Hayel (left) surveying sites for development projects in Taiz, Yemen. (taiznet.net)

According to Minister Razzaz, Yemen suffers from “the most water shortages in the Arab region.” He pointed to Yemen’s increasing population growth rates and limited rainfall for the exacerbation of the country water crisis, noting that at its current state Yemen would soon be unable to sustain its supplies.

“The precarious water situation in Yemen can be better appreciated when you consider it is the only country in the world that uses groundwater for agriculture, industry and for drinking,” explained the minister. This has dangerously depleted Yemen underground water reserves, which reserves cannot be replenished easily. Yemen has therefore to think outside the box. Sea water desalination said the minister is a perfect solution, not only for Yemen but for the region as well as Yemen’s partners in the project will to benefit from the plant.

Middle East Water Challenges Targeted by USAID and Partners

To address water scarcity in the Middle East, USAID’s Middle East Bureau (USAID/ME) is launching the Middle East Water Security Initiative (MWSI) in order to improve sustainable, long-term access to water for millions of people living in the Middle East.

MENA Desalination drives technological change

MENA Desalination Drives Technological Change

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Multi Stakeholder Solutions

The MWSI will target Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, West Bank/Gaza, and Morocco and promote sharing of best practices and lessons learned among the five participating geographic areas. MWSI will support transformational approaches to water-related challenges that promote local solutions and include citizen-focused education and engagement.

Multi Sector Engagement Options via Genesis NanoTech (GNT)

Align MENA Local and International Initiatives with Nano Enabled Technologies

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Water Public Private Partners

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GNT JV of University / Industry Partners

USAID seeks opportunities to co-create, co-design, co-invest, and collaborate in the research, development, piloting, testing, and scaling of innovative, practical and cost-effective interventions to address water solutions. The solutions sought are partnerships that address water management challenges in the Middle East and North Africa. USAID Middle East Water Initiative

Nanotechnology Investors Provided Risk Bearing Capacity Via Public Leveraging

Quantum Innovation Solutions

World Economic Forum World Economic Forum

“Right Place and Right Time’ investment opportunities are provided by Genesis Nanotechnology, Inc. (GNT) as global marketing opportunities reassure investors that they have a safety net against potential losses – “a first loss-protection.”

GNT Business Plan Genesis Nanotechnology Business Plan

These mature, financially capable market sectors represent potentially Billions if not Trillions of Dollars in new “nanotechnology enabled markets and products” – GNT Business Plan. Soon we will see the swell in the ranks of the “Early Majority“ as the market accepts and then demands: the enhanced manufacturing platforms, input cost reductions, increased warranty life, the superior performance of end use products and multiplied values that nanotechnologies provide.

“Clinical trials are a critical stage of product development for the pharmaceutical biotech company,” and those clinical trials are most likely a major cost of the investment portfolio. The costs of clinical trials and market introductions can be absorbed by the public…

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Nanotechnologies to Change the Economics of Desalination

“Fire-hose volumes and velocities out of your garden hose.”

“High Volume Materials enable seamless integration & applications with 80% to 90% cost reductions.”

Maximize Investments via Global Challenges

North Africa / Middle East – Yemen Fights – Deaths from Water Scarcity      Yemen Fights - Deaths Over Water

  • 4,000 people die each year over scarce water resources
  • Civil war means around 20 million people are without clean drinking water

By 2025, two-thirds of the world’s population may live in areas where access to safe water is limited

884 million people lack access to safe water supplies — approximately one in eight people

6 kilometres is the average distance African and Asian women walk to fetch water.

CleanWaterFactFigures3.6 million people die each year from water-related diseases 98 per cent of water-related deaths occur in the developing world

84 per cent of water-related deaths are children ages 0–14

43 per cent of water-related deaths are due to diarrhea

65 million People are at risk of arsenic poisoning in the Bangladesh, India and Nepal area

Leveraging the Global Water Challenge via Grand Solutions

Lake Mead, with the Arizona intake towers of Hoover Dam, has shrunk to its lowest point since being filled with the Colorado River in the 1930s. The light ring shows the high water mark. John Locher / The Associated Press 2014

Lake Mead, with the Arizona intake towers of Hoover Dam, has shrunk to its lowest point since being filled with the Colorado River in the 1930s. The light ring shows the high water mark. John Locher / The Associated Press 2014

Leveraging the Water Challenge from North Africa, the Middle East to California and Arizona with enabling technologies, companies, and funding sources.

GNT Business Plan

GNT is creating strong alliances with Nanotechnology Global Research Universities together with Nanotechnology Marketplace and Industry Leaders to commercialize cutting edge technologies, bringing together “Science and Business” to foster nanotechnology innovation. The Canadian Government has committed over $1.1 Billion through the Economic Action Plan 2013 (Federal) and through the Small Business Venture Capital Act (Provincial) seeking to stimulate economic activity and world leading research and development in Nanotechnology Innovation. The United States at the same time has invested over $3.7 Billion via the National Nanotechnology Initiative and the European Union over $1.6 Billion to foster nanotech innovation and commercialization.

Nanotechnology Investors Provided Risk Bearing Capacity Via Public Leveraging

World Economic Forum

World Economic Forum

“Right Place and Right Time’ investment opportunities are provided by Genesis Nanotechnology, Inc. (GNT) as global marketing opportunities reassure investors that they have a safety net against potential losses – “a first loss-protection.”

GNT Business Plan

Genesis Nanotechnology Business Plan

These mature, financially capable market sectors represent potentially Billions if not Trillions of Dollars in new “nanotechnology enabled markets and products” – GNT Business Plan. Soon we will see the swell in the ranks of the “Early Majority“ as the market accepts and then demands: the enhanced manufacturing platforms, input cost reductions, increased warranty life, the superior performance of end use products and multiplied values that nanotechnologies provide.

“Clinical trials are a critical stage of product development for the pharmaceutical biotech company,” and those clinical trials are most likely a major cost of the investment portfolio. The costs of clinical trials and market introductions can be absorbed by the public sector by smart companies who take advantage and include public entities during the scale-up process. This is a ‘great asset’ Genesis Nanotechnology brings to the investment negotiating table. Historically the private sector has not taken advantage of public sector leverages, and indications are still not really availing themselves the opportunity.

GNT process is a reply to the World Economic Forum’s Entrepreneurial EcosystemEntrepreneurial Ecosystem Mazzarol 2014 – In trying to shape the growth of such ecosystems attention should be given to the support of [private sector] firms with high growth potential that can help to generate a “big win” early on… However, care must be taken by governments not to try to pick winners or over engineer the system. High growth firms by nature are inherently risky and highly innovative firms are typically unique. As such there is no magic formula for their success – [a role is played by Genesis Nanotechnology to “discover, secure, develop and position Early Stage Nanotechnologies (TRL 3 to 9) for Commercialization”].  In seeking to help stimulate entrepreneurial high growth firms it is important…to avoid flooding the system with too much “easy money”. This can take the form of government grants and venture capital funds that are too easily obtained.

What is important is to grow firms with strong root systems that can sustain their own growth as much as possible before seeking additional funding. Such firms should be financially sound; profitable and well managed, or their likely success rates will be low.

The focus should be on encouraging sustainable, growth oriented and innovative firms not simply fostering more start-ups. Starting a new business is the easy part, successfully growing it is the challenge.

The Societal Impact of the “Invisible” – Nanotechnology: New Nanotechnology Report: Institution of Mechanical Engineers

Great Things from Small Things .. Nanotechnology Innovation

Nanotechnology: The Societal Impact of the Invisible – highlights the enormous potential for nanotechnology in our society but calls on the Government to increase funding for nanotech development to ensure the UK does not fall behind other nations.

Report author Dr Helen Meese, Head of Materials at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, said: “Nanotechnology could revolutionise the way we live our lives – it can be used in everything from food and healthcare to electronics, clothing and cosmetics.  But despite its 40 years in the public domain, the nanotechnology industry is still failing to engage with society in an open and clear way, and governments continue to lack impetus in committing to international regulation. The UK Government must provide more funding to ensure that the UK benefits fully from nanotechnology’s potential.

“The QELFA device is a brilliant example of what’s possible. Using an old technology like a pregnancy tester and…

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Nanotechnology Grand Challenges and Emerging Markets – What’s In It For Us and Them?

Private sector actors are key players for delivering marketable solutions for grand challenges and in doing so to create value added growth and employment.EmergingMarkets

Grand challenges, involving a combination of major public and private interests, are seen as key for realizing future economic growth, and are concerned with important social and/or environmental problems. Grand challenges are not to be defined, assessed or solved by any single scientific or technological discipline or within one specific sectoral policy framework. Societies are facing complex, interlinked, global and local challenges.

Achieving Social Development PhotoA highly dynamic innovation sphere may turn a challenge field into a dynamic and demanding market which triggers the development of new institutions, organisational innovations, new technologies and fundamental research questions. The general move to challenges thinking at policy level definitely influences choices made by private sector players.

Philanthropy and International AID Agencies Move Markets

Matt Damon and Gary White, Water.org

Matt Damon and Gary White, co-founders of Water.org

Traditional charity models are becoming outmoded. What began as investments in digging wells have evolved into far more dynamic, market-oriented approaches like targeted grants intended to optimise social returns per philanthropic dollar.

The PepsiCo Foundation has pledged $35m to water programmes in developing countries (including $12.1m to Water.org). Most of this has gone to Water.org’s WaterCredit model, a microfinance initiative which links access to finance with access to water and sanitation. The Caterpillar Foundation is investing $11.3m in this market-based approach over the next five years.

Markets to Project for Long-term toward Grand Challenges

Blockbuster and one-size-fits-all  …are slowly exiting the market to make room for the [revolutionary] era. A bottom-up approach was used to calculate the global market for nanomaterials used in theranostics which will be more than $187 billion in 2017. Grand Challenges further expand market opportunities and their projected-reach to include ultimate beneficiaries in emerging markets – though five, ten, and even fifteen to twenty years into the future.

Emerging Markets and Nanotechnologies WIN-WIN for Investor and Beneficiary

Impact Investing in Emerging Countries PhotoEconomic theory suggests that an investment in an early stage venture is inherently higher risk and will be compensated with higher returns given a successful exit as compared to investments in later stage firms with lower risks. Impact investing is an emerging investment field that is gaining popularity as individual and institutional investors seek ways to obtain financial returns while making a positive impact on society and the environment. However, impact investing in the U.S. is not only nascent but complex. Impact investment funds vary significantly with respect to the source of capital, investment vehicle, location and sectors for investment, expectations regarding both financial and social returns, and potential exits.

India Food BillBecause of the “predicted broad impact on society, governments of both developed and developing countries must investigate what the likely applications would be, and whether or how to best facilitate their evolution. They affirm that the combination of multiple complex technologies involved with the development of many nanotechnologies will necessitate the training and support of researchers capable of this type of technological interaction. Late comer countries can build market capabilities in the area, but only with high level of government support in terms of training and infrastructure.” Nanotechnology and Development: What’s in it for Emerging Countries?

Nanotechnology and DevelopmentNanotechnology is a generic platform with potential applications in many sectors. It promises to be a motor of economic growth with inclusive development through innovation related to materials, foods, medicines, and so on. This book identifies the nature and magnitude of the nanotechnology divide between high-income countries and the rest of the world. It also studies the determinants of the evolution and functioning of state policy and technology clusters in developed regions like the USA and the EU in order to identify the strategies that can or cannot be replicated elsewhere. Tracing the trajectories in nanotechnology being carved out by four emerging countries: China, India, Brazil and Mexico, it identifies common as well as country-specific factors that influence the rates of return to public and private investment related to nanotechnology in emerging countries. The book also makes policy recommendations to bridge the nanotechnology divide while promoting economic growth and inclusive development.

NanoTech Start-ups, Public-Private Partnerships, and Global Logistics

Building an international private enterprise collaborative capability calls for shifting the focus from administering transactions toward managing relationships with trusted partners.Border Round Table MeetCutFin

Having led multiple international private and public sector development and trade ventures between developed and emerging nations, this blogger’s forty year career has found logistics to be an all encompassing challenge in the acceptance and movement of products internationally. The most difficult intersections are deal making, getting the product developed, evaluated, and accepted for in-country purposes, international finance and contracting, transportation, on-site installation / start-up, and on-going long-term sustainability. These and a multitude of details need to be addressed continuously throughout the process. Private nano-enabled enterprises therefore collaborate with public implementing agencies to effectively transition technologies internationally while resolving far reaching Societal Grand Challenges (refer to The Role of Public-Private Partnerships – 2013).

Waterloo-Bordeaux - Path to a Privileged PartnershipA Bio-based Chemistry Program to be jointly managed by Bordeaux University, France and Waterloo University Canada  is indicative of long-term and far-reaching collaborations. It’s the only one in Canada, and may be unmatched in the world.

However national governments and industry observers state the challenges in the commercialization of university technologies and products go beyond the investments of Angels and VCs. Many failures litter the way to success while ‘crossing the “Valleys of Death.” The combined strengths of a private AND public sector market driven team can make the difference.  Oversight and guidance by seasoned technologists, innovators, and developers led by private sector interests with public sector infrastructure facilitation, provide bridges and/or circumvent gaps to Societal Challenges. There is broad understanding of the underlying issues, and the role of technology. Decision-makers—donors, social impact investors, program officers, employees in government agencies, practitioners working in NGOs— make their decisions with adequate information or analysis.

Bordeaux Waterloo Bio-based Chemistry

In that nanotechnology is not a product…and Not Even an Industry, but rather science, engineering, and technology conducted at the nanoscale …its motto being instead of “ever higher, ever farther” is “ever smaller, ever faster, ever more efficient,” makes nano logistics even more challenging. A Case Study at the US / Canadian Border and The Role of Public–Private Partnerships in Facilitating Cross-Border Logistics provides applicable insight as to how the public and private sector can collaborate in industrial ‘nano-enabled’ start-ups.

Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) require actors from each sector to adopt characteristics and points of view that once defined and stabilized the identities of their counterparts. That is, business actors need to embrace public interest considerations and expect greater public accountability, and government actors need to think and behave like entrepreneurs (Linder 1999). Business-initiated PPPs provide a mechanism for this role-reversal.

PPP Interagency Coop Chart

Informants echo Stein’s (2000) findings on economic development agencies: “the most successful programs…over the last decade have been true PPPs, driven and led by the private sector” (p.25).

Joined in business

Informants in this study described PPP performance along three dimensions: (1) operating with a systems view; (2) responding to business needs in support of economic development, and (3) providing a structure for identifying and resolving issues. Reports of the highest performing PPPs included those that institute broad economic development projects that reach beyond the local level to regional or province/state levels. [In the case of Nanotechnologies, Quantum Innovation Solutions states the reach should be on an ‘international or even global level’ considering Societal Grand Challenges some of which may require 10-15 years and beyond which are the PPPs ultimate goals]. These partnerships are not solely concerned with the prosperity of one or two businesses in isolation, but rather the economic health of the larger system. Therefore, private sector members of PPPs must expand their views to a systems level (Stewart et al. 2009).

Managerial Implications

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Business managers and public agency administrators can use results of this study to improve the effectiveness of Public Private Partnerships. Building a private enterprise collaborative capability calls for shifting the focus from administering transactions toward managing relationships with trusted partners. This shift requires competent leadership that works tirelessly to build relationships with partners in the public sector. To identify appropriate partners, members of the business community must recognize their role in the larger global trading network and be willing to work for the public good. Furthermore, the business community must be ready to take the lead in establishing PPPs to ensure the ongoing development and maintenance of the logistics infrastructure for global trade.

BorderPeopleIn the public sector, inter-agency cooperation was described as the extent to which agencies within a country and across country borders work together to facilitate cross-border logistics. Cooperation requires mission alignment, shared outcomes, and information integration. The first step in attaining inter-agency cooperation requires getting border management agencies within countries on the same page in terms of their missions as they relate to trade facilitation. The next step is to develop a common understanding of shared, outcome-based standards that serve as organizing principles for rationalizing procedures within countries and across country borders. The final step to enabling inter-agency cooperation is to link multiple agency databases in an information portal that provides a single view of the trade customer. Working to improve inter-agency cooperation is necessary not only to improve the performance of PPPs, but also to respond to the broader level of accountability of public agencies.

Davis, D. F. and Friske, W. (2013), The Role of Public–Private Partnerships in Facilitating Cross-Border Logistics: A Case Study at the U.S./Canadian Border.JOURNAL OF BUSINESS LOGISTICS, 34: 347–359. doi: 10.1111/jbl.12032